129 Results

UK Tech needs a mental health check

-          Half of tech professionals in the UK (+600,000) have been concerned about their state of mental health due to work -          1 in 5 professionals that work in IT operations are currently affected by mental health concerns -          ‘Unsupportive’ companies are almost three times more likely to have people who are concerned about their mental health right now -          Those working over 50 hours a week are twice as likely to be concerned by their mental health Half of the UK’s tech professionals have been concerned about their mental health due to work, either in the past or right now. This is equivalent to over 600,000 UK tech professionals[1] having had mental health concerns as a result of their work. The Harvey Nash Tech Survey, which surveyed over 2,000 tech professionals, also found that 1 in 5 workers in IT Operations are currently concerned about their mental health. While the survey found that companies are relatively supportive when it comes to mental health issues, with three-quarters (77%) having at least some kind of support in place, it also found that those companies who are ‘unsupportive’ have almost three times as many workers concerned about their mental health right now as ‘very supportive’ ones. A similar trend emerged regarding how flexible an employer is on working arrangements: very inflexible businesses are three times more likely than highly flexible ones to have workers with mental health issues (31% versus 9%). The causes of stress? The single highest cause of stress is being short of staff. This has become a major issue as recently revealed by the Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey which found that the UK’s tech industry is experiencing the highest skills shortage for more than a decade, with almost two thirds of CIOs (64%) reporting a shortfall of talent. It seems that the existing tech team are the ones being stretched to breaking point to make up for this. Hours worked has a direct impact on stress levels, with the tipping point at over 50 hours a week. Tech professionals working these hours are twice as likely to be affected by stress to a great extent - and see their work suffer as a result - than those that work under 50 hours a week. Tech professionals are most likely to be currently affected by mental health concerns if they: ·       Work 60+ hours per week – 21% ·       Work in IT operations– 20% ·       Work for a very small company (revenue <$1m) - 17% ·       Work in retail or leisure – 22%  Albert Ellis, CEO of Harvey Nash, said: “No one would pretend that working in the tech sector is a walk in the park, but for it to be pushing over half its workers into a state of mental health concern is a real issue for the sector, and in particular, for those very small companies where a greater proportion of workers report that they are currently affected by stress.  Albert Ellis, continued: “While it’s understandable that tech leaders are focused on tackling the combined pressures of widespread skills shortages, Brexit planning, and the impact of automation on their business, they still need to look very closely at how they provide support to those members of the tech team that feel overwhelmed by their mounting work load and associated pressures. This is particularly relevant as our research clearly found that there is a strong connection between mental wellbeing and how supportive a company is.” Michael Grant, President of BCS – The Chartered Institute for IT, said: “These findings clearly underline that, as a sector, tech needs to do more about mental wellbeing. While tech firms continue to be a hotbed of creativity and dynamism, driving innovation and growth in the economy, there is also a flipside that the pace and pressure can take its toll on individuals sometimes. Whether a large corporate or a small start-up, the right support needs to be there. This is an area that BCS is already actively discussing and researching within the IT community, and we look forward to progressing thinking and best practice on this hugely important issue in the coming months.”  Looking after staff's mental wellbeing is only likely to get more important as the tech sector enters a period of accelerating change. The survey found that: ·   Impact of automation on jobs - Over one-third (34%) of tech professionals believe their job will be affected significantly by automation in the next decade, of whom 7% believe it is happening right now - especially in testing, infrastructure and operations. ·   Skills won’t last forever – Keeping up with new tech is a tough game and, as technology evolves, so do the skills required to be successful. In fact, three in ten tech professionals expect their current skills to be out of date within three years, rising to over six in ten in six years. Testers and Operations feel the most pressure to keep their skills up to date. ·   Work/life balance – A quarter of respondents left their last job because it didn’t provide them with an acceptable work/life balance, with finding the right work/life balance being the second most important factor when looking for a new job. ·  Where are the women – While organisations have implemented diversity and inclusion programmes, they seem to be making little difference to the gender balance, with women making up just 16% of tech teams in the UK. ·  The future is flexible – Almost half (43%) of respondents believe that the biggest growth area in technology jobs will be ‘gig’/freelance work.  Albert Ellis, concluded: “Good work/life balance is key to retaining and attracting tech talent and keeping them well and happy. But our survey shows that the tech sector has further to go - and more still needs to be done to attract a wider range of people into the industry. Part of this is about showing the individual how a job will work with their own personal life, not just highlighting how amazing the job will be. “With so much set to change so quickly in the coming years, it’s vital that the tech sector makes itself resilient by looking after its people and giving them the support and flexible tools they need.” -ENDS- Media Contacts: David Pippett ProServ PR david@proservpr.com +44 (0) 7899 798197  About the Harvey Nash Tech Survey 2020 In its seventh year, The Harvey Nash Tech Survey 2020 report, Mapping the Tech Genome, is based on a survey of 2,088 tech professionals across 72 countries, making it one of the largest tech studies in the world. The data in this press release is solely based on the UK sample, which comprised of over 1,200 tech professionals. Please get in contact if you require global data. About Harvey Nash Leading technology recruitment We are masters of technology recruitment, helping organisations find the very best talent – from software developers to business transformation leaders. With over 30 years’ experience and global reach, we have an unparalleled knowledge and capability in all areas of technology. We are part of Harvey Nash Group, a leading global professional services organisation with three key areas of focus: Technology recruitment, IT solutions and Leadership services. To learn more, please visit www.harveynash.com. Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/harveynashgroup.  [1] The UK government calculates there are 1.3 million jobs in technology in the UK (Source: ONS). With over half of the UK’s tech professionals having been concerned about their mental health due to work, either in the past or right now, this is equivalent to over 600,000 of the UK’s tech workforce.

The Launch of the 2019 Harvey Nash/ KPMG CIO Survey in Glasgow

Held at 29 in Glasgow's Royal Exchange Square, our CIO event welcomed just under 80 CIOs and technology leaders to hear the results of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey. Our photographer was there to capture it all. Take a look in our dedicated photo album. We were delighted to be joined by our panel, chaired by Albert Ellis, CEO of Harvey Nash Group, who were: Paula Sussex - CEO - Student Loans CompanyGarry Fingland - Group CIO - Weir GroupKeith Robertson - Chief Architect - Registers of Scotland 6 things we learnt at the event... A time of massive change. 44% of organisations expect to change their product/service offering or business model in a fundamental way in the next 3 years Technology doesn't stop evolving. Organisations are continuing to invest in emerging technology - 1 in 20 are currently investing in quantum computing, for example The rise of business-managed IT. Almost two-thirds of organisations allow business-managed IT investment, and approximately 1 in 10 actively encourage it Up to 1 in 5 jobs will go to robots. Typically, survey respondents believe around 10% of their organisation's workforce will be replaced within 5 years by AI / automation Relentless rise of cyber-crime levels out? After tracking the growth of cyber-crime and confidence in dealing with the threat for some years, this is the first time the incidences have levelled out and confidence has grown CIOs: ready for disruption. Not only is technology disrupting sectors, it's disrupting the role of the technology leader too. Executive board membership is down, and an explosion of new job titles and roles have occurred, from Chief Digital Officer to Chief Data Officer and beyond Fantastic audience participation saw a lively debate across a multitude of topics. From the challenges of legacy estates, the pros and cons of cloud solutions, thoughts on future AI transformation and even the potential use of quantum computing in the work environment! Some interesting quotes... About legacy and innovation.... Paula: How do you marry the legacy estate with all the innovation?  Keith: We know a few things about legacy; we've been around for over 400 years! We need to start talking about systems about products that deliver value to the business. Paula: Re Student Loans Company - how can we be any other than a customer service focussed technology company? Albert: technology seems to transcend all sectors  On cloud...  Garry: Some organisations rushed too quickly into cloud. Risk management is key.  Paula: The public sector has a particular challenge about how cloud is costed. Audience member: we now view cloud as more safe than on prem  Keith: Don't lift and shift from on prem to cloud, you'll be carrying all your problems with it.  Garry: It's not a panacea  Paula: The CapitalOne issue wasn't cloud, but how it was configured.

The Launch of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey in Bristol

Held at KPMG’s office in Bristol, our CIO event welcomed just under 100 CIOs and technology leaders to hear the results of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey. Our photographer was there to capture it all.  Take a look in our dedicated photo album. We were delighted to be joined by our panel, chaired by Albert Ellis, CEO of Harvey Nash Group, who were: Laura Lafave – CISO & Co-Founder – OnCorps Cijo Joseph – CIO – Mitie Gareth Hetheridge – Global Head of IT – Rolls Royce  6 things we learnt last night… A time of massive change. 44% of organisations expect to change their product/service offering or business model in a fundamental way in the next 3 yearsTechnology doesn’t stop evolving. Organisations are continuing to invest in emerging technology – 1 in 20 are currently investing in quantum computing, for exampleThe rise of business-managed IT. Almost two-thirds of organisations allow business-managed IT investment, and approximately 1 in 10 actively encourage itUp to 1 in 5 jobs will go to robots. Typically, survey respondents believe around 10% of their organisation’s workforce will be replaced within 5 years by AI / automationRelentless rise of cyber-crime levels out? After tracking the growth of cyber-crime and confidence in dealing with the threat for some years, this is the first time the incidences have levelled out and confidence has grownCIOs: ready for disruption. Not only is technology disrupting sectors, it’s disrupting the role of the technology leader too.  Executive board membership is down, and an explosion of new job titles and roles have occurred, from Chief Digital Officer to Chief Data Officer and beyond Some interesting quotes…  Cijo: The CIO role will be gone in 10 years. You will always need an IT department, with things like quantum computing coming you will always need people to understand and implement technically, but I don’t think you will need a CIOLaura: You will always need a gatekeeper role to avoid (for instance) five different cloud solutions launched by the business.Natalie Whittlesey (Harvey Nash): I’m seeing the board becoming much more technology savvy. This is both good for the CIO and bad, as some board members can actually take too much controlGareth: A lot of board members want to get briefed about technology, but they fail to get briefed about the relevance of itAlbert: Our board snapped to attention after the ICO fined BA £100m fine for data privacy contraventions Laura: A report came out from the government saying that GDPR has helped raise people’s attention about cyber security. I’m seeing a lot of people talking about it more. I’m also seeing an issue with blackmail, where someone has identified a GDPR infringement, recognising the potential fines, and trying to get money from the companyGareth: One of my business programmes is the Tempest fighter. When we saw shadow IT grow we got our in house cyber team to hack into it to show they needed to address securityGareth: All our cyber attacks have come from legacy systems or the supply chain. We are now needing greater collaboration with our partners, from a technology perspective this is giving us a big challenge. I can see some really interesting uses of block chain here.Gareth: The challenge is the technology we put into our planes is incredible, but our IT systems are not!  We need to recognise the value of IT.Cijo: Amazon have a wonderful model, they try things on themselves before they role it out to customers. We should all be like Amazon.Audience member: If you move quickly you need to risk assess quickly too, otherwise things will go wrong Laura: Shadow IT (business managed IT) can be very good for a business Albert: There’s no such thing as unconscious bias. You can’t be biased if you’re unconscious! It’s sub conscious biasCijo: AI - it’s about the data that you feed in, not the algorithms. Our history of data has been created with bias

Albert Ellis, CEO Harvey Nash Group, featured in top 100 influencers in recruitment

London, September 9 2019 – Albert Ellis, CEO of the global technology recruitment, IT outsourcing and leadership services organisation Harvey Nash Group, has been named in SIA’s Staffing 100 Europe List. The list, now in its seventh year, recognises executives whose contributions have helped shape the world of work.  The group comprises CEO’s from across the recruitment industry including strategists, technologists and reformers.  The list is based on the impact and influence individuals have had on the workforce solutions ecosystem and in navigating a complex landscape and competitive industry. Albert Ellis has been active in the professional recruitment industry for over two decades having multiple roles with Hays plc, the largest professional recruiter based in the UK and the Harvey Nash Group. He is also a Trustee on the Board of Asia House, is an active member of Cambridge University’s Rustat Conference, a leading think-tank, and has been a member of the External Advisory Panel for the Information Leadership Network at Cass Business School. “The 2019 Staffing 100 Europe honourees bring acumen and vision together as they take on today’s business-related challenges, against a backdrop of political uncertainty, Brexit, youth unemployment, immigration and economic fluctuations,” said Subadhra Sriram, Editor & Publisher, Media Products at SIA. “As they launch new programmes, undertake geographic expansions, invest in technology and innovation, their commitment and passion are laudable, with their contributions helping shape a market worth an estimated EUR 172 billion in 2018. We extend our congratulations to all this year’s honourees.” Albert Ellis said of his inclusion on the 2019 list “I’m honoured to be included in this list.  Harvey Nash has undergone a complete transformation in the last two years and is now one of the world’s leading technology recruitment, IT outsourcing and leadership businesses.  I am delighted to see that the work put in by the Harvey Nash leadership team has been recognised in this addition to the 2019 Staffing 100 List”. If you’d like to find out more about SIA’s Staffing 100 Europe List, you can do so at http://si100europe.staffingindustry.com/.   About Harvey Nash Group Harvey Nash has helped over half the world's leading companies recruit, source and manage the highly skilled talent they need to succeed in an increasingly competitive, global and technology driven world. With over 2,500 employees in 36 locations, we have the reach and resources of a global organization, whilst fostering a culture of innovation and agility that empowers our people across the world to respond to constantly changing client needs. We work with clients, both large and small, to deliver a portfolio of services: technology recruitment, IT outsourcing and leadership services. To learn more, please visit www.harveynash.com Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/harveynashgroup About Staffing Industry Analysts (SIA) SIA is the Global Advisor on Staffing and Workforce Solutions Elevating the Workforce Solutions Ecosystem Founded in 1989, SIA is the global advisor on staffing and workforce solutions. Our proprietary research covers all categories of employed and non-employed work including temporary staffing, independent contracting and other types of contingent labor. SIA’s independent and objective analysis provides insights into the services and suppliers operating in the workforce solutions ecosystem including staffing firms, managed service providers, recruitment process outsourcers, payrolling/compliance firms and talent acquisition technology specialists such as vendor management systems, online staffing platforms, crowdsourcing and online work services. We also provide training and accreditation with our unique Certified Contingent Workforce Professional (CCWP) program. Known for our award-winning content, data, support tools, publications, executive conferences and events, we help both suppliers and buyers of workforce solutions make better-informed decisions that improve business results and minimize risk. As a division of the international business media company, Crain Communications Inc., SIA is headquartered in Mountain View, California, with offices in London, England. To find out more, visit www.staffingindustry.com

Mapping the Tech Genome - Take part in our 2020 Technology Survey

We’ve created a 10 minute survey to find out what drives the tech population in their careers.Take part here.So what’s in it for me?After completing the survey, you will have instant access to the results so far, giving you a fascinating snapshot of the data in real timeWhen the results are published fully later in the year, we’ll give you exclusive access to the full report, including salary benchmarking and access to our data sandpitYou’ll be invited to one of our fantastic tech meet ups, or webinarsIt’s your chance to tell us what you think and influence your industry.  For those who have insights to share, we will even act as a platform for your own views, opinions and social postings (with your permission of course)Surely those four reasons are enough to take part!We want to know what the make up of today’s tech professional looks like, and who better to ask than somebody just like you!Last year over 2000 people in more than 70 countries took part.  Will you join them? Take part here.

Non Clinical Temporary and Fixed Term Staff Framework Appointment.

Appointment to Lots 2 and 3 under RM6160 Non-Clinical Temporary and Fixed Term Staff Framework.We are really pleased to announce that Harvey Nash has been named as a supplier on RM6160 – Non-Clinical Temporary and Fixed Term Staff Framework, released by The Workforce Alliance.CCS, in collaboration with Procurement in Partnership (PiP), has established a framework contract with multiple suppliers for the supply of deliverables to the UK public sector and any Crown Dependencies.Harvey Nash are suppliers under the following lots as part of the Framework:Lot 2: Corporate Functions Lot 3: IT Professionals  Harvey Nash are one the UK’s leading providers of technology and digital talent to the public sector. Clients can access support, expertise and highly effective recruitment for the following resources under this agreement:Corporate FunctionsFinance, Accounts and AuditHRProcurement and SuppliesProject ManagementPublic Relations and Customer ServicesSenior BusinessMedia ServicesIT Professionals Technology LeadershipBusiness Change and TransformationDigital and DesignArchitectureInfrastructure and OperationsSoftware Development and EngineeringData AnalyticsInformation Security/Cyber SecurityProject ManagementWe are able to supply services under lots 2 and 3 across Scotland, North West England, North East England and Yorkshire, the Midlands, East of England, London, South West England and South East England. For more details of the services Harvey Nash are able to provide via the Health Sector Resourcing Framework, do not hesitate to contact a member of the Framework Team.About Harvey Nash Harvey Nash has helped over half the world's leading companies recruit, source and manage the highly skilled talent they need to succeed in an increasingly competitive, global and technology driven world. With over 2,500 employees in 36 locations, we have the reach and resources of a global organization, whilst fostering a culture of innovation and agility that empowers our people across the world to respond to constantly changing client needs. We work with clients, both large and small, to deliver a portfolio of services: technology recruitment, IT outsourcing and leadership services.To learn more, please visit www.harveynash.com. Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/harveynashgroup. About CCS Crown Commercial Service supports the public sector to achieve maximum commercial value when procuring common goods and services. In 2018/19, CCS helped the public sector to achieve commercial benefits worth £945m – supporting world-class public services that offer best value for taxpayers.About Workforce Alliance NHS Procurement in Partnership and Crown Commercial Service (CCS) are two public sector organisations that have come together in collaboration with the intent to explore the whole portfolio of health workforce services as part of a new Workforce Alliance.Framework ContactsFor further information and to discuss opportunities please contact the following:Victoria Payne – Harvey Nash Tel: 07545 741 185 Email: Victoria.payne@harveynash.comGeorgia Gillett – Harvey Nash Tel: 07889 507 502 Email: Georgia.gillett@harveynash.comMichelle Osman-Kamara – Harvey Nash Tel: 0207 333 1818 Email: michelle.osman-kamara@harveynash.comMedia Contacts:Michelle Thomas Harvey Nash michelle.thomas@harveynash.com +44 (20) 7333 2677

Tech Talks Tuck Shop - Watch Our Monthly TV News Programme

Tech Talks, Harvey Nash’s ground-breaking podcast for technologists, has launched Tuck Shop, a monthly broadcast discussing the latest breaking tech news…all accompanied by a selection of chocolates, sweets and treats from the 1990s (is it just us, or are Wagon Wheels so much smaller than they used to be?)... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgMKK7CHGV4 Launched in partnership with Disruptive Live this week the Tech Talks team are joined by Tom McGillycuddy, Co-founder of Tickr & Julie Fedele, Principal Consultant at ThoughtWorks. Tech Talks is an award winning podcast, launched and supported by Harvey Nash. A regular member of Apples' top 50 technology podcast charts, and winner of Computing magazine's Digital Ambassador award Tech Talks attracts thousands of listens each month from a diverse community of tech entrepreneurs, digital professionals and technology experts. www.tech-talks.com

The Launch of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey in Newcastle

Held at the Crowne Plaza, Newcastle, our annual CIO event welcomed more than 100 CIOs and technology leaders to hear the results of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey.Our photographer was there to capture it all.  Take a look in our dedicated photo album.We were delighted to be joined by our panel, chaired by Albert Ellis, Global CEO of Harvey Nash. The panel was made up of:James Homes – CIO – North P&I Association Graeme Fletcher – CIO – Connect HealthLesia Gibbons – Exec Level Transformation Director Kirsten Edmondson – Digital Delivery Director – BGL GroupOliver Davy – Head of Strategy and Architecture – Northgate plc6 things we learnt last night…A time of massive change. 44% of organisations expect to change their product/service offering or business model in a fundamental way in the next 3 yearsTechnology doesn’t stop evolving. Organisations are continuing to invest in emerging technology – 1 in 20 are currently investing in quantum computing, for example.The rise of business-managed IT. Almost two-thirds of organisations allow business-managed IT investment, and approximately 1 in 10 actively encourage itUp to 1 in 5 jobs will go to robots. Typically, survey respondents believe around 10% of their organisation’s workforce will be replaced within 5 years by AI / automationRelentless rise of cyber-crime levels out? After tracking the growth of cyber-crime and confidence in dealing with the threat for some years, this is the first time the incidences have levelled out and confidence has grownCIOs: ready for disruption. Not only is technology disrupting sectors, it’s disrupting the role of the technology leader too.  Executive board membership is down, and an explosion of new job titles and roles have occurred, from Chief Digital Officer to Chief Data Officer and beyondSome interesting quotes…Oliver: “Waterfall gets a bad name, but I think there’s still a place for it especially in digital change when those foundations are being put in place.” Graeme : “I completely agree that there needs to be common sense and there are facets of agile that are great when applied, but it has to be of benefit of the business and that’s when you can apply different methodologies when needed.”Kirsten: “At BGL our bonuses are based on cultural milestones, which for a financial services company is very left-field. I think that outlines how important culture is. We need people who have the customer experience at heart.”Lesia: “Whilst you can bring contractors in for the short term to deliver change, it is worth utilising the skills of your employees from other departments or other roles. This is a benefit to both cost and culture.”James: “Culture for us is absolutely vital and it’s something I have instilled. Some of our more junior people have come in and hit the ground running. One finished university on the Friday and started with us on the Monday. That type of person can be invaluable.”As the North East tech community shared ideas, the 2019 CIO Event was a reminder of the diversity of thought within the region and how we can utilise these discussions to the betterment of businesses in region. Our CIO survey allows organisations of all sizes to compare themselves on a global scale and gain unprecedented insight into issues facing the wider IT landscape. If you missed the event, feel free to contact our Newcastle office to arrange a meeting for a tailored overview of the publication. 

The Launch of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey in Leeds

Held at the Everyman Cinema, Leeds, our annual CIO event welcomed more than 130 CIOs and technology leaders to hear the results of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey.Our photographer was there catching it all. See photos here.We were delighted to be joined by our panel, chaired by Will Parker, Associate Director at Harvey Nash, which included: Mark Rice – CIO – thebigwordBella Abrams – Director of IT – University of SheffieldMike Jolley – Group CISO – Lowell Financial6 things learnt last night A time of massive change. 44% of organisations expect to change their product/service offering or business model in a fundamental way in the next 3 yearsTechnology doesn’t stop evolving. Organisations are continuing to invest in emerging technology – 1 in 20 are currently investing in quantum computing, for exampleThe rise of business-managed IT. Almost two-thirds of organisations allow business-managed IT investment, and approximately 1 in 10 actively encourage itUp to 1 in 5 jobs will go to robots. Typically, survey respondents believe around 10% of their organisation’s workforce will be replaced within 5 years by AI / automationRelentless rise of cyber-crime levels out? After tracking the growth of cyber-crime and confidence in dealing with the threat for some years, this is the first time the incidences have levelled out and confidence has grownCIOs: ready for disruption. Not only is technology disrupting sectors, it’s disrupting the role of the technology leader too.  Executive board membership is down, and an explosion of new job titles and roles have occurred, from Chief Digital Officer to Chief Data Officer and beyondSome interesting quotes…Mark: “Our CIO survey takes a picture of change”Mike: “This year has been the highest number of technology leaders who have said they’ve had a budget increase (55%)”Mark: “20% [of roles expect to be automated in the next 5 years] - however there will be many new roles which will come in the future that people can take through”Mike: “We have seen a significant amount of progress to become IT literates and push this [business-managed IT] forward”Bella: “it starts and ends with what your principles are. ‘We value trust significantly more than we value control’”Mark: “The issue is you need to be able to demonstrate that you are interested. Creation of decent working environment is important.” – when discussing why there aren’t more women in ITMark: “It is so obvious if having a diverse workforce is just a ticking box exercise.”Bella: “For as long as people feel diverse work environments is a choice, the longer it will be an issue and won’t change.”Bella: “Don’t tackle it as a problem. Think of it as a solution”

The Launch of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey in Birmingham

Held at the scenic Library of Birmingham, our annual CIO event welcomed around a hundred CIOs and technology leaders to launch the results of the 2019 Harvey Nash/ KPMG CIO Survey.Our photographer was there to capture it all.  Take a look in our dedicated photo album.CEO of Harvey Nash, Albert Ellis took us through the agenda followed by the CIO Practice’s very own Natalie Whittlesey and Lily Haake sharing the fascinating results of the survey.We were delighted to be joined by our fantastic panel, chaired by Chris Seel, Director at Harvey Nash, which included:Sian Jones – CEO, XoserveChris Leggett – COO, Invenio Business SolutionsDavid Leach – Director of IT & Transformation, Orbit Group6 things we learnt last night…A time of massive change. 44% of organisations expect to change their product/service offering or business model in a fundamental way in the next 3 yearsTechnology doesn’t stop evolving. Organisations are continuing to invest in emerging technology – 1 in 20 are currently investing in quantum computing, for example.The rise of business-managed IT. Almost two-thirds of organisations allow business-managed IT investment, and approximately 1 in 10 actively encourage itUp to 1 in 5 jobs will go to robots. Typically, survey respondents believe around 10% of their organisation’s workforce will be replaced within 5 years by AI / automationRelentless rise of cyber-crime levels out? After tracking the growth of cyber-crime and confidence in dealing with the threat for some years, this is the first time the incidences have levelled out and confidence has grownCIOs: ready for disruption. Not only is technology disrupting sectors, it’s disrupting the role of the technology leader too.  Executive board membership is down, and an explosion of new job titles and roles have occurred, from Chief Digital Officer to Chief Data Officer and beyondSome interesting quotes…Sian: “We have a motto at Xoserve that Everyone’s a CIO… It’s completely inconceivable that we’d put anyone in a C-Suite job that a) isn’t a great leader and b) isn’t a commercially savvy individual. I think the world is very quickly going to get to the point where you need to be a great leader… commercially savvy AND you need to be a technology leader.”Chris: “CEOs of the past should be looking over their shoulders.”David: “With governance, I like a nice healthy tension. If you haven’t got the tension… you have the balance wrong.”Sian: “It’s a war on talent. You need to have a clear vision and a sense of why.” Chris: (governance is) “Fundamentally about engagement from the outset; trust needs to be in the rhythm of what IT does”David: “A lot of technology transformation is less about the technology and it’s about how you are as a business.”Sian: “You can be whatever you want to be. Actually tech skills that you have are the base level entry point, so the question is: what do you care about the most? – Employees? Customers? The worlds your oyster. ”Chris: “The successful organisations will be the ones where the technology leader IS the CEO, is driving those right conversations, driving change… transforming the organisation, not just from the balance sheet… but also making sure the underlying fundamentals are right.” David: “With platform based businesses, we trust somebody we’ve never met and there is a group of people who are growing up with that in their mind. Would they have a different perspective on what trust is?”

The Launch of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey in London

Held at the Shangri-La in The Shard, London, our exclusive London CIO event welcomed just under 100 CIOs and technology leaders to hear the results of the 2019 Harvey Nash / KPMG CIO Survey.Our photographer was there to capture it all.  Take a look in our dedicated photo album.We were delighted to be joined by our panel, chaired by David Savage, Director from Harvey Nash, who were:Charlotte Baldwin – Chief Digital and Technology Officer – Freshfields Bruckhaus DeringerBen Lavender – Chief Product Officer – DAZNPaul Schulz – Chief Technology & Product Officer – PerkboxDiarmaid Crean – Chief Digital and Technology Officer – Sussex Community NHS Foundation Trust6 things we learnt last night…A time of massive change. 44% of organisations expect to change their product/service offering or business model in a fundamental way in the next 3 yearsTechnology doesn’t stop evolving. Organisations are continuing to invest in emerging technology – 1 in 20 are currently investing in quantum computing, for exampleThe rise of business-managed IT. Almost two-thirds of organisations allow business-managed IT investment, and approximately 1 in 10 actively encourage itUp to 1 in 5 jobs will go to robots. Typically, survey respondents believe around 10% of their organisation’s workforce will be replaced within 5 years by AI / automationRelentless rise of cyber-crime levels out? After tracking the growth of cyber-crime and confidence in dealing with the threat for some years, this is the first time the incidences have levelled out and confidence has grownCIOs: ready for disruption. Not only is technology disrupting sectors, it’s disrupting the role of the technology leader too.  Executive board membership is down, and an explosion of new job titles and roles have occurred, from Chief Digital Officer to Chief Data Officer and beyondSome interesting quotes…Charlotte: ‘Transformation doesn’t have a start and end date; it’s always evolving’Paul: ‘From next year, 46% of the workforce will be millennials – they demand change quickly and expect their work to reflect their personal life when it comes to apps and instant messaging’Diarmaid: ‘It’s much easier to hire people once you meet them and can sell them the purpose of your organisation’Charlotte: ‘Security has to be built in from the beginning; it’s critical it’s not thought of too late’Diarmaid: ‘Once you’ve caught up with security, it will actually help you with transformation’Ben: ‘We use machine learning to help with big data and analytics as we just have too much data and not enough analysts’David: ‘Quantum computing is the new space race’Paul: ‘Data is an asset; the speed we process it is important’Paul: ‘There are 2 challenges with transformation as BAU. 1) it’s difficult to control budgets when there will be tech you haven’t forecast, and 2) people hate change – they see it as unsettling, when really it should be freeing’Charlotte: ‘Technology is an enabler for the business strategy – do you attract strong talent if you don’t have a seat at the table?’Ben: ‘Attracting talent in the UK is a real challenge, unlike in other countries where we have staff’Paul: ‘I hire people who are passionate, flexible and hungry to learn and hungry to be repurposed’Ben: ‘The majority of our development was done via partnering. While scaling up, we are still dependent on it’

The Tech spend outside IT department creates opportunities...

-          2019 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey, of over 3,600 IT leaders, finds business-led IT[1] is creating more value than ever before, but with it comes a need for better governance -          Security and privacy risks rise for those business heads that sidestep the direct control of the IT department -          Up to 1 in 5 jobs are set to go to robots, but new jobs will compensate, say 69% of CIOs LONDON – June 12 2019 – Almost two-thirds (63%) of organizations now allow technology to be managed outside the IT department, a shift that brings with it both significant business advantages and increased privacy and security risks, reveals the 2019 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey. When IT spend is managed away from the direct control of the CIO companies are twice as likely to have multiple security areas exposed, and more likely to become a victim of a major cyber-attack. The largest technology leadership survey in the world, analyzing responses from organizations with a combined technology spend of over US$250bn, reveals for those organizations where the IT team is formally involved in decision making around business-led IT, business advantages include improving time to market new products (52% more likely to be ‘significantly better than their competitors’) and employee experience (38% more likely to be ‘significantly better than their competitors’). However, four in ten (43%) companies are not formally involving IT in those business-led IT decisions. These organizations are twice as likely to have multiple security areas exposed than those who consult IT[2], 23% less likely to be ‘very or extremely effective’ at building customer trust with technology, and 9% more likely to have been targeted by a major cyber-attack in the last two years. These risks are uncovered at a time when cyber security reaches an all-time high as a board priority (56% vs 49% last year). The huge opportunity to capitalise on the value of business-led IT, but also manage its risks, comes at a time of significant change for the business, the CIO, and the IT department, as the survey found: - Fewer CIOs sit on the board - although the influence of the CIO remains intact (66% this year view the role as gaining influence compared to 65% in 2018), fewer CIOs now sit on the board – dropping from 71% to 58% in just two years. - Artificial Intelligence (AI) and automation is driving huge change – as the IT department is being tasked by its board to use AI/automation to improve efficiencies (up 17% this year as a board priority), this is leading CIOs to expect that up to 1 in 5 jobs will be replaced by AI/automation within 5 years. This is likely to lead to a significant reorganization of roles across the business. However, 69% of CIOs believe that new jobs will compensate for job losses to AI/automation. - Skills shortages – technology leaders are struggling to find the right talent with skills shortages at their highest level since 2008. The three most scarce skills are big data/analytics (44%), cyber security (39%) and AI (39%).   “In an age where anyone with a smartphone and credit card can set up an IT system, there are both incredible opportunities and major risks. Those enterprises that get the balance right between innovation and governance will be the winners,” said Albert Ellis, CEO of Harvey Nash. “At the same time, boards are asking their CIO and technology team to prioritize automation of jobs. How organizations adapt to automation will increasingly become a priority, and many are not at all ready.” Steve Bates, Global Leader, CIO Advisory Centre of Excellence, KPMG International, said, “There is no longer business strategy and technology strategy, it’s simply strategy with technology driving it. This research clearly shows that organizations putting technology in the hands of value-creators and connecting the front, middle and back office are winning in the market. The future of IT is a customer obsessed, well governed, connected enterprise.” Digital leaders perform better Digital leaders, which are organizations that consider themselves ‘very effective’ or ‘extremely effective’ at using digital technologies to advance their business strategies, performed better than their competitors on every aspect surveyed: · These aspects included time to market (53% vs 34% for the rest), customer experience (65% vs 49%), revenue growth (55% vs 43%) and profitability in the last year (50% vs 37%). · Digital leaders are also more likely to introduce ‘major new changes to products and services’ in the next three years (55% vs 39% for the rest), and focus on making money - 76% of CEOs in digital leader organizations want their technology projects to ‘make’ rather than ‘save money’, compared to 58% for the rest. Gender diversity initiatives are failing big tech · 74% of IT leaders feel their diversity and inclusion initiatives within their teams are at most moderately successful, and there has been only minimal growth in women on tech teams, 22% this year compared to 21% last year, and no change in the percentage of female technology leaders at 12%. First signs of Quantum Computing · Although Quantum Computing[3] is at such an early stage, 4% (107 global organizations) have implemented Quantum Computing to at least some degree – with big pharmaceuticals, financial services and energy organizations making bets in this area. · A fifth (22%) of organizations implementing Quantum Computing were based in the UK, followed by 19% in the US, and 7% for both Australia and the Republic of Ireland. IT leaders reporting budget increases – highest for 15 years · More technology leaders reported increases in IT budgets under their control than at any time in the last 15 years. · The jump in those reporting increases (from 49% to 55%) is the largest seen, with the one exception of 2010, when organizations were still clawing their way out of the global recession. · For technology projects where the CEO prefers to ‘save money’ almost half (45%) of respondents report budget increases compared to just 38% last year, suggesting many CIOs are investing to save, for instance through automation. About the Survey In its 21st year, the 2019 Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey is the largest IT leadership survey in the world in terms of number of respondents. The survey of 3,645 CIOs and technology leaders was conducted between 13th December 2018 and 4th April 2019, across 108 countries.  For more information about the survey and to request a full copy of the results, please visit www.hnkpmgciosurvey.com. [1] Initially referred to as ‘shadow IT’, business-led IT refers to the inexorable rise of technology expenditure controlled outside of the IT department. [2] 16% of organizations that don’t formally involve IT in business-led IT decisions versus 7% for those that do. [3] Quantum computing is the use of quantum-mechanical phenomena such as superposition and entanglement to perform computation.

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